Sports psychology studies what successful people

do. One of the most profound things, validated through

study after study of many great athletes, is that if you

take a group of athletes with equal ability and some

receive mental training while others do not, the ones

who were given mental training will always outperform

those without. Why? Simple: because those who use

mental training skills develop a Mental Edge.

Once, when I was young, my grandfather took me to

see the legendary soccer player from Brazil-Pele-at

Tampa Stadium 먹튀검증.

I’ll never forget that warm summer night, as he

dominated the game with three electrifying goals. That

was a long time ago, but I’ll always remember the way he

dodged down the field, feinted and swerved on a dime to

get past defenders, the ball seemingly glued to his feet-

until he let it fly inside the goal posts.

Years later, I came across a story about Pele in the

writings of the late Gary Mack, a noted sports mental

trainer with whom Pele had shared what he considered

to be the two keys to winning-Enthusiasm and a Mental

Edge.

Pele told Gary about the routine he used before

every game he played. He would go into the locker room

about an hour early and find a private corner in the

locker room. Then he would lie down using a towel as a

pillow and cover his eyes.

Pele explained how he began to watch a film in his

mind’s eye: a film of himself as a kid playing soccer on

the beach in Brazil. He let this “movie” bring back

glorious memories of the sand, the warm sun on his

back, the ocean breeze feathering his temples. He would

vividly recall the thrill of the game, the joy that it

brought to him; he would immerse himself in his love of

the game, allowing himself to relive those glowing

memories. Allowing himself to feel them.

In short, before every single game he played, Pele

made sure to put himself in touch with his pure love of

his sport.

Then Pele moved forward in his mental movie. Pele

described how he began to review and watch himself

relive some of his greatest moments in world

competitions. He talked about letting himself feel and

enjoy the intensity of those winning feelings over and

over again. He talked about how crucial it was for him

to make a strong connection with those feelings and

images in his past before he proceeded to imagine

himself performing at his absolute peak in the upcoming

event.

Finally, Pele told Gary that he would see himself as

he was about to become: playing brilliantly, scoring

goals, dribbling past defenders in a mental movie made

up of positive images with strong feelings of enjoyment

and triumph. He imagined everything before it ever

happened: the crowd, the atmosphere, the field, his own

team, his opponents, he saw himself playing irresistibly

like a champion-as a force that could not be stopped.

But most important, he told Gary, was to remember that

it was not just about vision and imagery, but also about

feeling the emotions associated with success. He

pointed out that he vividly imagined how good it all felt.

Only after about a half-hour of relaxation and mental rehearsal,

would Pele begin to stretch and prepare his muscles for the job

they had to do. By then, he could relax because he had already

primed his mind for victory. By the time he’d jogged into the stadium,

he was (almost literally) unstoppable. Physically and mentally he was

armed and fortified to win. No one could touch him.

In that short time with Gary, Pele shared with us

exactly how to tap into what he considered the two

essential keys to winning: Enthusiasm and a Mental

Edge.

I share this lesson with all my clients and suggest

that they too create an internal place, a place where their

minds can go before any event in order to rehearse,

visualize, feel, and prepare exactly as Pele used to. This

is where you go to play and watch your mental highlight

tapes; this is where you once again connect with the fun

and love of your sport, to feel that winning feeling. Most

of all, this is where you go to mentally prepare yourself

and to gain the mental edge before battle.

For the athlete who’s just starting out and who may

not have past successes to replay, I suggest that they

pretend that they do and that they watch themselves as if

they did. After all, it’s your movie! You’re the director

and producer, the editor and writer, and the more

imagination you can squeeze into your movie the better.

Mix in some enthusiasm with your imagery and now

both of Pele’s keys to winning are in the formula. It’s

also important to practice seeing yourself overcoming

adversity and staying in control whatever might arise.

This doesn’t make for arrogance-though it might sound

like it. It creates confidence. Confidence is different

from arrogance, and confidence is one of the keys to

performing well.

Use the same routine that Pele did to get things

going for yourself. Practice mixing relaxation, imagery,

feelings, and enthusiasm, prior to competition in a pre-

game routine, in order to gain a mental edge and a sure

sense of confidence going into the event. In this lesson,

you have one of the most successful athletes in the world

telling you how he went about preparing for

competition.

Pearls of wisdom.

Remember: One must consistently practice

mental skills and pre-game routines in order to

tap one’s full potential.

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